Baylor Case: Public Statements Can Waive Privilege

Baylor University was concerned that it was not in full compliance with federal law relating to complaints of sexual harassment and violence. Baylor also expected litigation.  Baylor’s Board of Regents hired the Pepper Hamilton law firm to investigate Baylor’s procedures, policies and other “institutional response” aspects of Baylor’s compliance obligations.  Baylor and Pepper Hamilton agreed […]

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Ignore an Audit – Go to Jail

A physician did nothing to change billing practices, even after Medicare denied some of the physician’s remittance claims as a result of an audit.  This and other evidence helped convict the physician of Medicare fraud. In U.S. v. Uzoaga, the government asserted that the physician knowingly allowed a third party to submit fraudulent bills on […]

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New York Court Says Judges Can Eliminate the Accountant-Client Privilege Held by Texans

Since 1979, Texas legislation has explicitly recognized an accountant-client privilege. A New York state court recently determined that it could order disclosure of any specific information subject to that privilege.  The ruling in New York v. PricewaterhouseCoopers, issued October 26, 2016, suggests that judges have complete discretion to disregard the accountant-client privilege. New York Attorney […]

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